Best Online Singing Lessons And Coaches From Udemy: A Top Ten List

For the past few weeks, I’ve been reviewing the best online singing lessons and coaches mainly from Udemy. I didn’t have a clear expectation of what would come up every time I researched one. But all I can say is that I wish online learning could have been available before. It could have saved some of the dreamers who had potential but never realized their dreams.

I’m not new to the music scene, and I’m not new to the Internet. But the web combined with the music still surprises me. Anyway, here are the top ten vocal coaches on Udemy.

Eric Arceneaux

Pros: Chances are, you’re already familiar with this guy. He’s one of the popular YouTubers who teaches singing online. I already knew him when he started his channel. And even without reviewing and researching his courses, I know they will be worth your while.

His courses start with the fundamentals and continue until you learn advanced singing techniques. Eric Arceneaux is your standard voice coach and teacher. You can’t go wrong with him regardless of your preferences.

Cons: The courses can be pricey. I recommend taking his three main courses. It can quickly burn $300 off your pocket, but the things you’ll learn are enough to make a pro out of you. If you’re really hesitating to invest your money on those, I advise that you wait for a promotion or discounts.

Eric Arceneaux

Roma Waterman

Pros: Details. If you’re an auditory learner or a person who absorbs knowledge significantly through speech, then Roma Waterman is for you. She discusses every nook and cranny when it comes to singing. Her lessons also focus on harmonizing and group singing.

Mainly, her courses are for beginners who’re utterly clueless on the basics. Secondly, she’s the best coach if you plan to join a singing group like a chorale.

Cons: I said it before on my review of her, but I want you to know that she has a mildly thick Australian accent. Her video presentation isn’t as professional as her. If you don’t care too much about those, then you definitely need to have her.

Roma Waterman

Steve Glazer

Pros: His main courses are called Singing Simplified for a reason. Glazer is the man you’re looking for if you don’t believe that the devil is in the details. He waters down every singing concept there is and focuses more on practice than theory. Even the techniques he teaches are reduced to the point that a kid can easily understand.

Glazer’s courses are ready to be consumed by anyone. It doesn’t matter your plans and reasons you want to become a better singer. If you can’t decide on where to start, his courses can be your salvation.

Cons: I dislike the pacing and length of his content. Most of his videos are only three minutes long by average. Maybe simplifying the lessons can drastically make them shorter to teach. It’s not a bad thing, but mostly my personal preference.

Steve Glazer

Paul McKay

Pros: His course is definitely not for amateurs and absolutely not for beginners. Paul teaches a very advanced technique called Riffs and Runs. If you’re not familiar with it, youcan skip to the next coach.

The guy’s laser-focused on teaching this technique and all of the things he’ll say will revolve around it. It’s laudable how creative he is since he also uses riffs and runs to train his students to develop their singing skills.

Cons: Its main pro is also its main con. His courses are very specialized. It would be really great if he releases a class that tackles general lessons on singing.

Paul McKay

Robert Lischetti

Pros: As an opera singer, expect that you will face a traditionalist. It means that you’ll learn how to sing better by the book. It’s amusing that this teaching approach had become one of the unique ones because this was the prominent method used when I was starting to sing.

The best thing about him, his approach, and his course is they’re reliably effective. You don’t have to doubt the end result of learning from him. You can rest assured that, by the end of his course, you’ll have significant improvements.

Cons: The only problem I had with him is he only has a few courses available. The ones in the platform mostly are for singing posture and breathing. They are definitely keys in singing, but I know that there are other things he can teach that students can significantly benefit from.

Robert Lischetti

Cathy Vard

Pros: Instead of showering you with details or simplified lessons, Cathy Vard markets her courses as mixing biology with music. Her goal is to be utterly familiar with your body, voice, and the art of singing.

She will also address issues about maintaining a performer’s mentality, motivation, and emotion. I now realized that being a wedding singer like she is frequently dealing with those three aspects of singing. A wedding singer often performs in front of a crowd with high expectations—it’s a special day after all.

Cons: We resonate on the saying that the body is your own instrument. Knowing each bit of organs plays both major and minor roles in helping you sing better. I’m no expert in biology and anatomy, so my interest has been piqued. But I was a bit disheartened because I expected her to talk about other parts of the body outside of the usual ones like the throat, nose, and diaphragm.

That’s just my misaligned expectation, so she still delivered what she promised.

Cathy Vard

Draven Grey

Pros: Here’s another specialist on the list. Draven is your go-to-guy if you want to learn how to sing with grit, growls, and screams. Basically, he’s for those guys who want to sing rock, metal, and grunge.

Despite being geared towards rough performers, however, regular singers can learn a thing or two in his course. He also teaches how to survive as a musician and become a pro in the process. Those are valuable lessons since working in the industry as a beginner isn’t precisely lucrative and can’t actually pay rent.

Cons: Like with Paul McKay, the main problem is that he teaches a specialized subject that is not meant for everybody.

Adam Mishan

Pros: His course can improve your singing ability in a month. Unlike the others, Adam focuses on teaching your body how to sing. This is a fast-paced program, which ultimately requires your complete cooperation.

Expect that you won’t learn any theory or technicalities. What you’ll get from Adam is continuous training and practice.

Cons: His course can be seen as a low-value service. It’s saving grace is that the exercises embedded in his classes do work.

Adam Mishan

Nathan Lawrence

Pros: He teaches at a slower pace than most of the coaches on this list. He also has the longest course out of all of them. Surprisingly, it isn’t ridden with filler materials or nonsense talks. All you get are meat and potatoes.

Cons: You need to take his courses in low doses and when you’re fully awake. Some of his segments can be a bit tedious to watch. I’m not saying that they are invaluable. It’s just his delivery and setup that has this relaxing effect that can make you fall asleep. I did drowse off when reviewing his course.

Nathan Lawrence

Robert Lunte

Pros: If a relaxing teacher or a traditionalist isn’t your cup of tea, have this coach. Robert Lunte can be loud, rowdy, and aggressive. This mix of traits can be charming to his target audience: aspiring rock stars.

He’s one of Draven Grey’s mentors, and he’s an innovative and talented teacher. He made his own theories, exercises, and techniques, which he teaches in his courses and written in his book. He’s the ideal teacher when you’re through with the fundamentals, and you want to explore music and singing outside the box.

Cons: He can easily bewilder new singers. He has a set of his own jargon. It can confuse almost everyone without prior experience and knowledge of singing. Even my brain was muddled while watching his videos. It took a bit of time before I got that ‘Aha!’ moment and understood what he’s teaching.

Robert Lunte

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